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Flax fibre

Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) fibre is obtained from the stem of plants belonging to the family Linacea. The fibre is obtained from a blue flowered plant and woven into a fabric generally known as linen Flax is the designation given in English speaking countries to bast fibre from the plant Linum usitatissimum L. of the Linaceae family. Although the word flax is understood in most countries, the word linen is more widely used both to designate the plant as well as the fibre. It is one of the most natural and most environment friendly of all textile fibres. Textile properties of flax fibre are superior to cotton. The common names of flax are alsi, tisi, kshuma, lin, llion, liner, linum, line, linen, lein and lan. The plant is an annual which grows to a height of about 3 to 4 ft and about 1/16th" to 1/18th" in diameter. Flax is grown in modern times for two entirely different purposes (i) for fibre and (ii) for seed. The seed of the flax plant is known as linseed. In India flax is grown primarily for linseed oil which is not only used for human consumption but also for commercial use as paint, varnish, finished leather and printing ink. Linen's history dates back to 7000 BC when Mesopotamians used flax. Later on Egyptians, Babylonians, Greeks, Romans and other civilized people cultivated flax for fibre. The ancient Greeks knew flax at a very early stage. In the middle ages, linen was the most important textile product. Flax, therefore, is one of the oldest and most interesting plants cultivated. The art of weaving flax was so advanced that wearing of 'linen cloth' was considered to be a sign of aristocracy and gleaming whiteness of linen as a symbol of purity. In fact , the word 'candidate' used for office seekers has its origin from the latin word 'candidus' which means white linen. The Egyptian art of weaving flax was gradually introduced in India, where linen was worn by many castes before the use of cotton. At present flax fibres are reported to have spun in countries like Belgium, Russia, Switzerland, Brazil, England, France and Argentina etc. and is used in making fine quality fabrics called linen. Flax, grown for textile purpose has long, almost branch-free stalks. The major producer of flax fibre is the erstwhile Soviet Union, but the world's best fibre comes from Belgium and adjoining countries. In India the manufacturer of line fabrics, import the flax fibres from European countries and does not utilize the flax produces in India. The reasons for this is, Indian flax does not match with the quality standards of imported flax. But now a number of dual purpose varieties including Gaurav, Shikha, Jeevan and Parwati released from Chandra Shekhar Azad University of Agriculture & Technology (CSAUAT), Kanpur are suitable for both oil and fibre purpose. Among the four varieties, the white flowered variety (Linum usitatisimum album) produces stronger plants and are resistant to diseases than the blue flowered vrieties (Linum usitatissimum vulgare) but the latter yields fine fibres of high quality. Among the oilseed crops, flax is next to rape seed and mustard. India occupies 25 per cent of world acreage and ranks first in area (4.368 Lakh ha), fourth in production (1.725 Lakh tonnes) and eighth in productivity (395.0 Kg/ha) of the flax crop. The yield of fibre flax is about 10-15 quintal/ha.

 

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It's impressive post

the plant as well as the fibre. It is one of the most natural and most environment friendly of all textile fibres. Textile properties of flax fibre are superior to cotton. The common names of flax are alsi, tisi, kshuma, lin, llion, liner, linum, line, linen, lein and lan. The plant is an annual which grows to a height of about 3 to 4 ft and about 1/16th" to 1/18th" in diameter. Flax is grown in modern times for two entirely different purposes for fibre and (ii) for seed. The seed of the flax plant is known as linseed. In India flax is grown primarily for linseed oil which is not only used for human consumption but also for commercial use as paint, varnish, finished leather and printing ink. Linen's history dates back to 7000 BC when Mesopotamians used flax. Later on Egyptians, Babylonians, Greeks, Romans and other civilized people cultivated flax for fibre.

Nice

Its nice post,I like it.European countries and does not utilize the flax produces in India. The reasons for this is, Indian flax does not match with the quality standards of imported flax.I am very best for this kindness.

 


the white flowered

the white flowered variety (Linum usitatisimum album) produces stronger plants and are resistant to diseases than the blue flowered vrieties (Linum usitatissimum vulgare) but the latter yields fine fibres of high quality. Among the oilseed crops, flax is next to rape seed and mustard. India occupies 25 per cent of world acreage and ranks first in area (4.368 Lakh ha), fourth in production (1.725 Lakh tonnes) and eighth in productivity (395.0 Kg/ha) of the flax crop. The yield of fibre flax is about 10-15 quintal/ha.

Brazil, England, France

Switzerland, Brazil, England, France and Argentina etc. and is used in making fine quality fabrics called linen. Flax, grown for textile purpose has long, almost branch-free stalks. The major producer of flax fibre is the erstwhile Soviet Union, but the world's best fibre comes from Belgium and adjoining countries.

Please note that this is the opinion of the author and is Not Certified by ICAR or any of its authorised agents.