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Chickpea

Dos

  • Chickpea is a dryland plant that prefers lighter, well-drained soils. Heavy clay soils are often too moist. Excessive moisture will delay flowering and maturity.
  • Improved cultural practices, like bunding, land levelling, adoption of proper dry farming practices, stirring the soil to improve infiltration, etc., are therefore necessary.
  • Modification of cultural practices such as deep summer ploughing and application of compost etc.
  • Bunding and stirring the soil with the desi plough in the rainy months increases the yield of gram.
  • Stirring with a spring-time harrow was as effective as that with the desi plough.
  • Roll the land to preserve moisture and to improve harvestability.
  • Use of resistant cultivars.
  • Sowing of healthy seeds (disease free).
  • For reducing wilt, treatment of seed with 1g Carbendazim + 2g Thiram or 4g of Trichoderma viride per kg of seed.
  • Inoculate with chickpea-specific inoculant (Rhizobium ssp. cicer). Follow the general guidelines for inoculating pulse crops.
  • If seed is treated, it should be planted immediately after inoculation, as seed treatments can be toxic to the inoculant.
  • Plant into moisture 2 to 3 inches deep.
  • Efficient cropping systems (intercropping) have been identified such as chickpea + mustard (NWPZ and NEPZ), chickpea + linseed (CZ) and chickpea + coriander or sunflower (SZ).  The contribution of chickpea towards nitrogen economy in succeeding crop under sequential cropping has been found 30-40 kg/ha. 
  • Soil application of 20-40 kg S/ha improved production on light textured soil of NWPZ which are generally deficiency in S.
  • Application of 25 kg ZnSO4/ha shown encouraging results in tarai belt of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar and on light textured soils of Punjab, Rajasthan and Haryana.
  • An effective management of several weeds can be achieved by pre-emergence application of pendimethalin @ 0.75-1.25 kg/ha.
  • If herbicide is not applied give two hand weedings on 15th and 30th day after sowing.
  • Under rainfed conditions, two sprays of 2% urea at the time of flowering and 10 days thereafter were found quite beneficial.
  • The crop is irrigated once or twice only when the soil gets much dried up in November or December. Further irrigation may not be needed. While irrigating necessary care should be exercised that there should not be waste stagnation.
  • Favorable response to irrigation has been observed in rainfed areas specially in central and south zones.  Irrigation at maximum branching and pod development stage has been most critical and increased the yield by 25 to 50%.
  • Micronutrient deficiencies (i.e.: iron, manganese) are rare but can occur. Tissue samples of plants showing symptoms should be taken and analyzed by a soil-testing laboratory.
  • Use your least weedy field (chickpea is a poor competitor with weeds).
  • Target 5 live plants per square foot.
  • Best results and best product quality if crop is left until the majority of the pods are straw yellow, or if direct harvesting, take crop off at 17 - 18% and dry down to 15% for storage.



Don'ts

  • Chickpeas are not well adapted to saline soils.
  • Do not apply large amounts of nitrogen, as this will reduce nitrogen fixation and delay maturity.
  • Post-emergent rolling or harrowing can cause severe crop injury.
  • Excess moisture may be equally harmful as the crop may be affected not only by lack of aeration but also by poor nodulation and low rhizobial activity.
  • Avoid using of bruchid infected seed for sowing

 

 

 






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great stuff! I am going to...

Amazing! I had hoped to grow my own chickpeas this year
because I love to put them in absoluty everything! thanks
a bunch for the article! 

Jericho

Jericho (PPNB) along with Cayönü in Turkey and in Neolithic pottery at Hacilar, Turkey. They are found in the late Neolithic (about 3500 BCE) at Thessaly, Kastanas, Lerna and Dimini. In southern France Mesolithic layers in a cave at L'Abeurador,  Aude have yielded wild chickpeas carbon.

Chickpea

Domesticated chickpeas have been found in the aceramic levels of Jericho (PPNB) along with Cayönü in Turkey and in Neolithic pottery at Hacilar, Turkey. They are found in the late Neolithic (about 3500 BCE) at Thessaly, Kastanas, Lerna and Dimini. In southern France Mesolithic layers in a cave at L'Abeurador,  dedicated servers Aude have yielded wild chickpeas carbon dated to 6790±90 BCE.[3]By the Bronze Age chickpeas were known in Italy and Greece. In classical Greece they were called erébinthos and eaten as a staple, a dessert or consumed raw when young. The Romans knew several varieties such as venus, ram and punic chickpeas. They were both cooked down into a broth and roasted as a snack. The Roman gourmet Apicius gives several recipes for chickpeas. Carbonized chickpeas have been found at the Roman legion fort at Neuss (Novaesium), Germany in layers from the 1st century CE, along with rice. Chickpeas are mentioned in Charlemagne's Capitulare de villis (about 800 CE) as cicer italicum, as grown in each imperial demesne. Alb rtus Magnus domain registration mentions red, white and black varieties. Culpeper noted "chick-pease or cicers" are less "windy" than peas and more nourishing. Ancient people also associated chickpeas with Venus because they were said to offer medical uses such as increasing sperm and milk, provoking menstruation and urine and helping to treat kidney stones. Wild cicers were thought to be especially strong and helpful.Mature chickpeas can be cooked and eaten cold in salads, cooked in stews, ground into a flour called gram flour (also known as besan and used primarily in Indian cuisine), ground and shaped in balls and fried as falafel, fermented to make an alcoholic drink similar to sake, stirred into a batter and baked to make farinata, cooked and ground into a paste called website design hummus or roasted, spiced and eaten as a snack (such as leblebi). Chick peas and bengal grams are used to make curries and are one of the most popular vegetarian foods in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and the UK. On the Indian subcontinent chickpeas are called kadale kaalu in Kannada, shanaga (శనగ) in Telugu, chana in Hindi and other Indic languages, Chhola in Bengali and konda kadalai in Tamil, where they are a major source of protein in a mostly vegetarian culture.

idney stones.

idney stones. Wild cicers were thought to be especially strong and helpful.Mature chickpeas can be cooked and eaten cold in salads, cooked in stews, ground into a flour called gram flour (also known as besan and used primarily in Indian cuisine), ground and shaped in balls and fried as falafel, fermented to make an alcoholic drink similar to sake, stirred into a batter and baked to make farinata, cooked and ground into a paste.