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This is knowledge model discussion blog, here KM experts can share their comments and views.

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There are so much ordinary

There are so much ordinary readers like me understand. i also appreciate people who give their very informatiev comments and not silly comments. i hope that i could also be of help to others. but in the meantine, thank you for coming out with a great article. Regards, 

smth to add here

Organizations are realizing how important it is to "know what they know" and be able to make maximum use of the knowledge. This knowledge resides in many different places such as databases, knowledge bases, filling cabinets and peoples' heads and is distributed right across the enterprise. Most of the time one section of an enterprise repeats work of another section simply because it is impossible to keep track of, and make use of, knowledge in other sections. Organizations need to know what their of knowledge assets are and how to manage and make use of these assets to get maximum retum

A recent American Economic Review

A recent American Economic Review article by David L. Carr, James R. Markusen, and Keith E. Maskus (CMM) estimates a regression specification based upon the 'knowledge-capital' model of the Multinational Enterprise (MNE). The knowledge-capital model combines 'horizontal' motivations for FDI -- the desire to place production close to customers and thereby avoid trade costs -- with 'vertical' motivations -- the desire to carry out unskilled-labor intensive production activities in locations with relatively abundant unskilled labor. The CMM estimates pool inward and outward U.S. affiliate sales data from 1986 through 1994 and appear to support the knowledge-capital model of the MNE. We show that CMM's empirical framework mis-specifies the terms measuring differences in skilled-labor abundance, key variables that identify vertical MNE motivations. After correcting this specification error estimates no longer reject the horizontal model in favor of the knowledge-capital model. Instead, the data strongly support the predictions of the horizontal model of MNEs: affiliate activity between countries decreases as absolute differences in skill-labor abundance widen. Qualitatively identical results are also found using that include a wider variety of parent and host countries, including data for the OECD.

correction

there is spelling mistake in sugarcane km model.use foliar insted of foller

Include Pigeonpea pod borer in crop taxonomy of Insect pests

Sir

Please include Pigeonpea pod borer (Helicoverpa armigega) in Crop taxonomy of Insect pests.It is major pest of pigeonpea in the world, please include its name and scientifica name under insect pests.This is for your kind inofrmation 

Include pigeonpea pod borer in crop taxonomy

Hello,

As for your information that most important insect pest of pigeonpea pod borer missing from pigeonpea crop taxonomy.

We have included Pigeonpea pod borer (Helicoverpa armigega) in Crop taxonomy of pigeonpea crop and also tagged your content to it.

Structure of Discussion on KM

 

Hello,

The KM stands for Knowledge Management which has different meanings in different organizations depending upon their need, approach and objectives. Here in agropedia, our purpose is to create and share our expertise and experience for the benefits of entire agro-community and hence to add value towards overall economic development. Here we can start our discussions on the existing knowledge models uploaded on the 'agropedia' website as per their relevance to the users. We can also move out to create other ways of structuring the agriculture based knowledge other than the existing 'knowledge models' as per the individual's convenience to create and the ease of use to the knowledge recipients. I request the web-visitors to enlighten this e-community to proceed further and make it a successful initiative.

 

In agropedia, KM is used for Knowledge Models.

The KM generally stands for 'Knowledge Management' but here in agropedia site the term 'KM' is mainly used for 'Knowledge Models'.

Knowledge models are the structural representation of knowledge by using symbols to represent pieces of knowledge and relationships between them. In our case we develop it by using the Concept Map (C-Map) Tools. A collection of Concept Maps when associated with resources (like text, image, audio, and video clips) is known as knowledge models (for details see the "Knowledge Model" menu from the menubar of the site). These have been designed with the intention of using them for indexing and browsing the content that we gather in the repository. That is knowledge models help in mapping the knowledge and tagging content so that the information is semantically searchable.

So, for this site Knowledge Models (KMs) act as the most important feature for Managing  and organising the wide spread knowledge in the agricultural domain. From that point of view, it can be said that Knowledge Management and Knowledge Models are two interdependent terms.

Modelling of Knowledge can be done in other ways

The current knowledge model presented on the agropedia website is an example of one of the best organisation and manifestation of the available knowledge. My concern was to broaden our initiative to introduce other potentially effective way of knowledge dissemination. For example, we can introduce the vocal map in localised language on the pattern of textual concept map and make the available knowledge easy to understand even by the those who can't read.

More easy-to-read Knowledge Models

Following the idea proposed by Amritesh, I remember that IITK and ICRISAT prepared some maps which allow also a graphical visualization of concepts, with pictures. I wonder if this can be extended not only to the main crops (like rice or wheat), but to other concepts of the KM, for example instruments used in agricultural practices may have a picture, or the seeds, or diseases...

Hello

capital model combines 'horizontal' motivations for FDI -- the desire to place production close to customers and thereby avoid trade costs -- with 'vertical' motivations -- the desire to carry out unskilled-labor intensive production activities in locations with relatively abundant unskilled labor. The CMM estimates pool inward and outward U.S. affiliate sales data from 1986 through 1994 and appear to support the knowledge-capital model of the MNE. We show that CMM's empirical framework mis-specifies the terms measuring differences in skilled-labor abundance

Please note that this is the opinion of the author and is Not Certified by ICAR or any of its authorised agents.