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Agricultural Research Networks As Development Tools

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Authors: 
Faris, D.G.( editor )(Affl: International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Patancheru 502 324, Andhra Pradesh, India ) International Development Research Centre
Book
Publication Year: 
1991
Publisher Details: 
International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics ; Patancheru 502324, Andhra Pradesh, India
ISBN: 
92-9066-205-0
Report/Series/Bulletin Name: 
Agricultural research networks as development tools: views of a network coordinator;Reseaux de recherche agricole en tant quioutils de developpement: avis d'un coordinateur de reseau / Faris, D.G.
Report/series/Bulletin Number: 
1

 


Citation: Faris, D.G. 1991. Agricultural research networks as development tools: views of a network coordinator. Ottawa, Canada: International Development Research Centre; and Patancheru, A.P. 502 324, India: International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics. An Agricultural Research Network (ARNET) is a cluster of scientists or institutions linked together by a common interest in working dependently or interdependently on an identified shared problem or problems. ARNETs are popular with agricultural research scientists, administrators, and donors as tools to strengthen the research capability of national agricultural research system s (NARSs) and to identify, address, and solve farmers' problems. An effective network will overcome isolation, facilitate sharing of research information and ideas, help reduce unnecessary duplication, provide the critical mass of effort needed to give quick answers to pressing problems, and hasten scientific breakthroughs. Inappropriate reliance on networks by NARSs can over extend their scientists and upset national priorities. ARNETs have five important components: membership, research, coordination, communication, and assets that interact with each other. Networks are dynamic and responsive to changing needs in agricultural systems. There are many types of ARNETs depending on the problems that need to be addressed, the membership and its requirements, the extent of coordination available or needed, the research strategy developed, and the assets available. The author shares in this book the results of his search to understand the workings, benefits, costs, and pitfalls of networks and he provides information from his own experience and that of others to help those wishing to organize and operate ARNETs.
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